Wednesday, May 05, 2010

Car Update...

So the Nissan Dealership was going to charge me $90 for the inspection on my car. They would not waive the fee but the fee could be applied towards a recommended service. Since that was pretty much the $100 I was going to save by going to the Mom & Pop shop, I told them to go ahead and fix my brakes.

I didn't get the air conditioner fixed or the fog light. I am going to still take it to the Mom & Pop Shop and pay the $50 to have them take a second look at the A/C before I spend $700 to get it repaired. Hopefully, it won't need anything major afterall.

The major update that I have is that my parents decided to bail me out of this car situation. The total cost for the regular maintenance and the brakes came to $615 and my parents wrote me a check for $600. I am NOT okay with this even though I wish at this moment I didn't have a conscience. I told them I had the money in savings but my Dad insisted and said he didn’t want to hear another word about it.

My parents are not wealthy. My Dad went back to work just to pay for his health insurance after retirement. They will never pay off their home and they both have car notes, one of which will be paid off this year and I believe the other one within the next 2 years. They are good people, decent people and only wanted the best for their children. I feel like a disappointment and a failure. I should be helping them out and not the other way around. They need to paint the house and get a new fence badly and they also need to pay for their vacation. I get the fact that my Dad got his first social security check last month but that is extra money for THEM and not ME. It’s just not right. They need to save some money for the house repairs and to pay for their vacation.

Should I give it back?

6 comments:

Anonymous said...

I think you should graciously accept the money and pay them back when you're in a position to.

Anonymous said...

I would give the $ back...if the purpose of this blog is to highlight your ability to manage your own finances, they continue to do so. The emergency fund is there for a reason.

SavingDiva said...

If I was in your position, I would give the money back. There is a time when you have to take responsibility for your own debts and money. I understand that it is a difficult position, but I think it's an important step toward financial freedom.

Broke by Choice said...

I think as we get older this is the only way parents feel they can "take care" of us, since we don't need them like we used to. If my parents offer money when I am in a tight situation or they choose to give money as a gift I always accept it and let them know how greatful I am.

Like you my parents aren't wealthy and in my opinion could use the money more. I your situation I would have to respect the fact that my parents are adults and are responsible for the way that they choose to spend their own money.

By no means are you a failure or disappointment to your parents. If I was a betting women, I would bet that they are extremely proud of you and are happy to help because you are making such an effort to better yourself.

Anonymous said...

WCB,

I am not going to say what I think one way or another. But what I think might be helpful is to think of this moment when you want to go and get a pedicure, for instance. Or you want to spend $50 on drinks with friends. You can decide where your money goes - does taking money from your parents bother you enough to make you prefer to pay them back with the money you would use to get a pedicure?

Optimize your spending plan reflecting what you value most.

Best of luck deciding! Cars are money pits!
Kris

Aaren said...

I agree wholeheartedly with Kris on this. My opinion doesn't matter in the least, but the fact that you're questioning this evinces, to me, your personal level of comfort. You don't need a bailout in this situation. You have twenty (20!) times the cost of these repairs currently available to you. If you choose to accept this, then you need to SERIOUSLY reconsider what you consider to be monthly necessities.